20.1.10

BJJ Tips: Wanna Get Better at BJJ / Grappling? What Are You Gonna Do About It?

On my way to work I listened to yet another excellent podcast by the Fightworks Podcast. The conversation in mind was with Pedro Sauer black belt Keith Owen. It was a great interview and, as great interviews do, it inspired a few questions in me:
  1. Apart from training at your gym/academy/school…etc., do you do any training on your own (attributes/technique)?
  2. Do you watch BJJ / Grappling material analytically?
  3. Do you read BJJ / Grappling material analytically?
  4. Do you research ways to improve your diet and supplementation?
All these questions revolve around one central theme:

In what way(s) are you taking ownership of getting better at the sport/art/endeavour you love so much?


Those of you who have been following this blog may now that I'm no believer in "discipline" or "sacrifice" and that my Buddhist inspiration automatically makes me more "NOW" and "experience" driven than "plans" and "future" so I'm not asking what do you hope/wish/plan on doing, adding, incorporating or stopping...etc. in order to understand and play BJJ / Grappling better, but rather what ARE you doing now?

Rather than try to live in the what-could/should/ought to-be, live in the what-is.

Above is a picture I took of my little daily lab. Every day that I go to the gym, I play with these tools to understand more about BJJ / Grappling. I don't do it because I should or ought to or even because someone recommended it. I do it because it makes me happy and because I see my favourite hobby in a different light.

How about you? Play much?

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2 comments:

Jason said...

I like your challenge. Don't sit around planning. Do it! Thank you for adding me to your blog roll also. I need to work mine over. I'll be sure to include you too.

The Part Time Grappler said...

Thanks Jason. I honestly think that in the long run, doing is much easier than talking.